FBHP title
  • header-photo2
  • watergdns_opt_opt
  • p1040464_opt
  • p1030415_opt
  • dsc_9770_opt
  • p11506393_opt
  • p1040415_opt
FBHP logo

Chair’s Welcome

I am delighted as Chair of the Friends to welcome you to our website. Bushy Park and Home Park are two wonderful large green oases in the south west corner of London. Feeling wild, they are natural places with ancient histories, fascinating heritage and superb wildlife. Both are Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) containing rare species. These are places to be enjoyed and conserved. Which is why the Friends exist, campaigning, supporting and protecting the parks, and enhancing visitors’ enjoyment with information, advice and guidance.

We are always pleased to receive feedback. You can contact us by clicking here.

Keep Up-to-date

Members and non-members can receive emails about events in the parks. To subscribe, please enter your email address below.


Report on 'Grow Your Own' by Cleve West

Report on 'Grow Your Own' by Cleve West

Grow Your Own
A talk by Cleve West
at the FBHP Annual General Meeting, March 2nd 2012

Cleve has an allotment adjoining Bushy Park and this is his 12th year. Allotment gardening is the opposite of designing for the Chelsea Flower Show as everyone is equal at the allotments.

12 years ago there were many vacant plots so he added the plot next door, built a shed and some raised beds.
The first year he managed to harvest a sack full of potatoes and one strawberry, only in the second a third years did he grow ‘real’ food.

Cleve gardens organically and doesn’t like killing any wildlife, so no slug pellets. His broad beans attract ladybirds, so no problem with aphids; he may trap rats, mice and rabbits and protects his crops against squirrels and pigeons. This year he had the added problem of alium leaf miner which ruined his leeks.

Borage and nigella are planted to attract insects and bees love the flowers of dianthus and fennel. Comfrey and nettles help fertilise the soil.

There is also a pond with frogs, toads and a grass snake and log piles to provide a habitat for stag beetles.

The addition of a greenhouse has increased the variety of what can be grown. He has a sedum roof on the shed, a scarecrow and compost heaps which look like beehives.

Cleve practices crop rotation but doesn’t always follow the rule book, taking advice from other allotment holders.

Common mistakes include underestimating the time requirement, planting too early, sowing too much, planting vegetables you don’t really like, not protecting crops and under or over watering.

The joy of allotment gardening is all about community and sharing with others. At the open days Cleve makes the best onion bhajis and a clay oven makes very good pizzas.

He has written a book entitled ’My Plot’ which is full of useful tips and lovely photos.

Many thanks to Cleve for a most interesting talk and for sparing the time in the busy run up to the Chelsea Flower Show.

Report by Jane Cliff

Why we need more Friends

With more members our voice is stronger when we campaign to protect the Parks, and with more subscription income we can do more to provide information and education about the Parks, their wildlife and their history.

Join us today!

Walks & Talks

Forthcoming event

Thursday, 23rd Nov 8:00 pm

The Royal Parks in the Great War. Talk by David Ivison

Latest report

A perimeter walk of Home Park led by Nicholas Garbutt was enjoyed by over 45 people on 2nd September.Walk in Home Park- 2nd September

Full report...

Information Point

The Information Point next to the Pheasantry Welcome Centre café is where our volunteers help visitors to find out more about the parks and where visitors can purchase souvenirs of your visit to support our work.

Click this panel to visit our Information Point section and also to find out how you can get involved as a volunteer.